GODIVA FESTIVAL: Do we really need it? This will help you decide!

Godiva festival started in 1998, and for the last two decades it has been famous for being the Midlands biggest three-day free festival.

In 2018, Coventry City Council spent three times more than the original allocated budget! So, this year they introduced ticket charges for the first time. These additional funds are supposed to help manage some of the rising festival costs.

Now that Godiva is no longer the Midlands biggest three-day free festival, do we still need it? Is it still a good event for the City of Coventry?

5 Reasons why Godiva Festival is still great for Coventry!

1. Family-friendly fun

This year’s Godiva Festival provided plenty of entertainment and activities for families:

  • Fairground rides for all ages.
  • A mini-petting farm with rabbits, goats, etc.
  • A Community Circus where attendees could learn to could stilt-walk and hula-hoop, etc
  • An Experi-Tent which had a marble run, a VR experience, and lots of other digital technology.   
  • A wide variety of live musical Entertainment.

I think Godiva is good because it’s great to see so many families enjoying the festival, it appeals to such a broad age range. The size of the park means you don’t feel overwhelmed by huge crowds either. I must say my favourite part of the festival is the silent disco …. it’s just so much fun, if you haven’t experienced it before then definitely pen it in for next year!

Sam @Missb68

2. Amazing Artists

Over the last two decades there have been some amazing artists at Godiva, and this year did not disappoint with the likes of Get Cape Wear Cape Fly, Dodgy, Reef, The Levellers, Busted, and Feeder.

It’s a low cost festival that offers music, fun and activities for all ages! There is something for everyone, whatever your taste.

It brings people to Coventry and promotes our ‘City of Culture’

It’s a great opportunity to spend quality time with friends and family in a relaxed environment.

Jane @joldbury

3. Godiva Supports Emerging local Artists

Every year Godiva runs a competition called ‘Godiva Calling’. This gives local bands and artists the chance to be selected to play at the festival.

It’s a showcase platform for emerging local musical artists

Wes @wesfinchuk

4. Cultural experience

People came together at Godiva Festival to listen to a variety of great music, laugh at comedy, get active with GoCV sports, chill out in the well being zone, learn new circus skills, dress up in silly outfits and have a generally wonderful time.

It’s a good opportunity for the people of Coventry to come together, regardless of social status. Godiva allows people on low incomes to have a cultural experience. It also promotes diversity, with acts from different groups

Rob @mrrjhopkns

This year, Coventry2021 brought the best Desi Music from across the Country to Godiva Festival.

What is Desi Music?

It’s a celebration of the music created, inspired or influenced by British Asian communities. Imagine artists performing a mixture of Bollywood, Bhangra, Qawwali, Reggae, Grime, Hip Hop and Folk-Electronica.

The UK Desi scene has created a unique fusion culture of art, fashion, food and above all music, which we celebrate in all its glorious diversity in the Rhythm Tent line up on Sunday.

Coventry 2021

5. Location

Godiva takes place in Coventry’s War Memorial Park, which is a great location!

If you have ever had to traipse across numerous farm fields or catch a shuttle bus just to get to a festival site due to limited onsite parking, then you will appreciate how easily accessible Godiva is.

A good location encourages more people from inside and outside of the city to attend.

Travel by Train: The Memorial park is only a 15-20 min walk from Coventry railway station, which is on the Main West Coast line.

Travel by Road: The Memorial park just off the A45, which also makes it pretty easy to access by road.

Godiva Festival is great for Coventry, it puts the city in the spotlight. I had friends travel from Birmingham, Stratford-Upon-Avon, and Guilford for the festival and they really enjoyed the weekend.

JAMIE @JAMIE_PANOT

Godiva Festival Images Taken by Regan @duskyblueskies

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“Something missing”, a solo exhibition by Sherrie Edgar

On 27 April 2019, I was invited to attend a private viewing for Sherrie Edgar’s first solo exhibition “Something Missing”.

This was an ambitious first solo exhibition that showcased some of her contemporary artworks, which explore the social politics and emotions of loneliness and solitude.

It was open to the public at the Artspace Arcadia Gallery from the 27th – 30th April 2019.

Who is Sherrie Edgar?

Sherrie is a Visual Artist, who specialises in Film & Photography. She’s from Coventry, and she is currently studying her MA in Contemporary Arts Practice at Coventry University. She is the first student on this course to host a solo exhibition before completing her Masters Degree. An impressive achievement, and why local art and culture critics are touting her as one to watch…

During the private viewing, Sherrie read a speech to discuss her work and thank us all for coming. She talked about the purpose and the critical thinking behind her artwork, and the struggle in accessing arts funding for her first solo exhibition. She told us about the time and effort involved in planning and organising each display at the Artspace Arcadia Gallery and how this was quite an isolating process. From her speech, it was very apparent how passionate and determined she is about sharing her contemporary visual artwork.

Sherrie is an extremely personable, bubbly, and likeable character. If you see another exhibition by her, I definitely recommend going along to chat to her if you have the opportunity.

You can follow her involvement with other projects or review some of her previous work here:
Twitter @TweetMonCher
Instagram @sherriegram
Vimeo vimeo.com/sherrieo

Some of my favourite pieces from “Something Missing”

How do you capture the sense of something missing? This is an interesting concept which has flitted in and out of my thoughts since viewing Sherrie’s exhibition.

Shrike 360

The Shrike Hotel room art exhibition is a collection of images from an immersive hotel room experience that encouraged participants to discover a sense of who the person was who occupied this room.

This immersive experience took place at the Coventry Britannia Hotel on 28 February 2019. The art installation included a representative sample of personal belongings, a film shown on the TV, and a personal cassette player.

Participants were given 35mm disposable cameras to take photographs or selfies to capture traces of the unknown person’s identity or a sense of their feelings.

I thought this was great because it really played on our sense of intrigue in discovering things about others. Some of the interesting images produced by the participants who engaged with this immersive experience are included on the slideshow below.

Digital Age

This was a 6 min film which explored the sense of loneliness and isolation in the digital age.

How can that be? How can people still experience a sense of isolation or exclusion when we are connected through digital devices or sharing so much of our lives on social media platforms? What’s missing? Is something missing in the digital age?

During this short film, Sherrie was lost in the code whilst she dictated a soliloquy of synonyms to express the sense of loneliness and isolation. I felt the sense of anguish in this film, it was a really strong visual and emotive representation of the loss of identity, and lack of physical interaction with others that sometimes comes with the digital age.

Support local art projects

Wouldn’t there be something missing in a world without Art & Creativity?

This month, some of Sherre’s artwork will be shown at The Arches Project in Birmingham and at Project Coventry on 20 June.

Will you be going along to support our local artists and projects?

All content and images by Regan @duskyblueskies

Why I love Igers Coventry & Warwickshire, and you should too!

What does Igers mean?

Instagramers Community logo

Igers is short for Instagramers. According to the Urban Dictionary, an Instagramer is someone who spends extremely long amounts of time on Instagram. Now, I can’t speak for my fellow admin or our Igers followers, but this could be a fairly accurate description of me. One thing that has always puzzled me though, should it be Instagramers or Instagrammers?

Grammatically and pronunciation-wise, I feel like it should be a double consonant to create a short ‘a’ vowel sound. Most websites and blogs tend to use the word Instagrammers with the double consonant. However, you will notice that all of the Instagram communities are called Instagramers of London or Instagramers of Madrid. I think this lack of a double consonant could be due to the fact that Igers Communities were established in Spain in 2011, where their first language is Spanish. Continue reading